Fanwork Critical Analysis #3
nyanja14

Fanwork Critical Analysis #3 (Fanfic: "100 Days 026 - 035")
Fanwork: Original Tumblr Posts 1 & 2 / On Livejournal 1 & 2 / On Fanfiction.Net

Context of this fanart:

(This fanfiction is a continuation of the first fanfic I did for this class, so I'm going to be repeating myself a lot...)

100 Days is a drabble series I began back in 2009 when I was at my height of involvement in the Nabari no Ou fandom. I got really sick in November of that year and pretty much stopped all fanfic writing at that point.

I began 100 Days as part of the 100 drabble challenge, though I'm not using a particular prompt table. The frame of 100 Days is that the drabbles are cataloging Yoite's last hundred days alive. (When he's introduced in the series he only has about three months left to live.) I don't constrain myself to exactly those one hundred days, but that's the basic concept.

1. Why did you choose to do this particular work?

I originally intended to make a fanvideo for my final work so I would have a complete set of three different works. I began working on the video and learning how to use video editing software, but it quickly became obvious to me that I would not finish in time. The professor said we were allowed to repeat a fanwork type, so I decided to continue working on the drabble series.

My reasons for beginning the drabble series back in 2009 and for picking it up again for this class remain the same. I began 100 Days because I enjoy filling up holes in the canon and because the Nabari fandom NEEDS MORE FANFIC. I picked the project up again because I felt guilty about never finishing. I'm thirty-five drabbles in out of one hundred, so I'm finally getting somewhere!

2. What about your fandom made you think this work would be successful?

This is fanfic focused upon Yoite and the Nabari fandom loves Yoite. I'm pretty sure that is My drabbles go from almost-cheerful to where-are-my-Kleenex, so there is something for everyone's tastes. Also, drabble series are nice to read because you don't necessarily have to remember what happened before the current update to understand what is going on. Since many people in this fandom kind of drift in and out, this is helpful.

3. What is successful feedback for this fandom?

The Nabari fandom is small, so any positive feedback is about equivalent to a standing ovation. (Okay, I'm exaggerating, but it's true.) I am quite happy with any comments I get and although I only very recently posted my latest drabbles I’ve already gotten a couple of very nice comments, so I consider this fanwork to be successful.


[FANFIC] [NnO] 100 Days (031 - 035)
nyanja14

Fandom: Nabari no Ou
Title: 100 Days
Author: nyanja14 (aka: Miss Fish, the_myrah)
Summary: TIDES, WONDERING, CURIOSITY, NOTES, HEAT
Word Count: 1411
Rating: Teen, to be safe.
Warnings: character death, abuse, general angst, and boys having crushes on other boys


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Reflection #12
nyanja14
What did you learn about your fandom? What creative work does your fandom perform? What further work could you do?

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[FANFIC] [NnO] 100 Days (026 - 030)
nyanja14
Fandom: Nabari no Ou
Title: 100 Days
Author: nyanja14 (aka: Miss Fish, the_myrah)
Summary: CANDLE, SMALL TALK, SUNLIGHT, SUSHI, ANNIVERSARY
Word Count: 1333
Rating: Teen, to be safe.
Warnings: character death, abuse, general angst, and boys having crushes on other boys


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"Create a Phenomenon" Justification
nyanja14

First, I decided to do a meme because 1) I do not have good video editing skills and thus a viral video was out and 2) the Nabari fandom isn’t very present on Twitter so trying to get a hastag trending there would be near impossible. Which left the meme option and thus “Nabari Fan” was created.


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Reflection #11
nyanja14

Write a short article on fandom in the voice of James Wolcott.

This reflection is late because I really frickin' hate James Wolcott's voice. I've been dreading sitting down and doing this. But here goes nothing...

Discussion of fanfiction invariably seems to begin with mounting defenses for the production of fanfiction, along with a built-in apology for poaching on some other author's creative territory. This, simply put, is balderdash. For thousands of years, mankind has been altering well-loved stories and presenting their "new" works for the world to see. If writing fanfiction is truly a lower form of writing, or even a crime, than Chaucer, Shakespeare, and numerous other writers from the Western canon need to be evicted from our education system.

For many years, fanfiction has been supposedly toeing the line of Copyright Law because first, the fans writing it have good intentions and don't make a profit, and second, there are far too many fanfiction writers to possibly sue them all. This framework for the legitimacy of fanfiction is utterly warped though because fanfiction is a natural occurrence. One of the first impulses of creativity is to rework a pre-existing story, or write a story like this one but with elements of that one, and so on and so forth. The idea of an "author," of somebody who actually is the originator of an idea, is ridiculous. There are no new stories, and therefore the concept of copyright is hogwash.


Reflection #10
nyanja14

It's been a few weeks since the last one, but finally we have reflection number 10!

What fandom do you wish you did for the semester project?

I'm pretty damn happy with Nabari no Ou, to be quite frank. I know that some people got disgruntled with their fandoms, but I just wound up like the Nabari fandom more. So... yeah.

There are fandoms I considered doing though. For instance:


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The Hidden World: Nabari no Ou Fandom as a Discourse Community
nyanja14
Things have been slow for a while over at this journal because of spring break and then my professor taking off for a conference. BUT, today I bring something nice and big.

The Hidden World: Nabari no Ou Fandom as a Discourse Community

Ta-dah! My ethnography! It's done! This is the report that my fandom survey earlier was for and now you can finally read the paper in all its glory. If you want to, anyway.

The paper is meant to informative for people who don't know anything about Nabari no Ou fandom (most people) so if you are in the community you probably won't learn anything new. However, I hope you find it interesting anyway.

Here's a quick run-down:

Q: What is an ethnography?
A: Basically, it's a paper describing a culture.

Q: What is a discourse community?
A: According to Mr. James Porter, a discourse community is "a local and temporary constraining system, defined by a body of texts (or more generally, practices) that are unified by a common focus." In less-fancy talk: a community that communicates with each other through a shared topic.

Q: Holy crap, why is this paper 40 pages long?!
A: I know, right!? I was complaining the whole time. Luckily for y'all, you don't have to read all that mess. The actual report is only a quarter of the document-- the rest of it is the appendix, which holds all the data I got from the survey and interviews. Obviously, you can read that too if you want. But it is loooooong.
 
More questions? Comments? Need to correct my grammar and typos? Let me know! This is my first time writing an ethnography (and an abstract) so if you are more experienced than me and can give me some pointers, I would be most grateful.

Nabari Fandom Survey Results are In!
nyanja14





It’s finally done!

This data is from a fandom survey I conducted between February 16th to today, February 23rd. I had a total of 86 respondents, all of which were required to answer the four demographic questions. (The essay questions were optional— about 39 people responded to those questions.)

Again, I’d like to thank everybody who participated in this effort. I am still working my way through the interviews and drafting the ethnographic report that these survey results will be used in. I will be sure to post that essay as well, so if you are interested stay tuned!

Any thoughts or reactions?


Reflection #9
nyanja14

So I thought I did this already, then I saw it in my drafts and realized it wasn’t done and that I’m dumb. Late post is late.

Come up with one observation, question, or commentary based on the issue of gender, sexuality, or other “controversial” topics that we should discuss in class (with regards to fandom) and why you think your commentary/question/observation would help further the conversation.

One gender issue I have definitely witnessed plenty of from my seat perched deep within Slash Fandom is misogyny from female fans. Yes, ladies hating on ladies.

Why? Because when fans slash two male characters, there is nearly always some female character that is the canon love interest in the story and thus “in the way.” Most fans just skirt around the whole canon heterosexuality thing and ship as they please, but some crazy fangirls instead deal with the canon by bashing the female character.

Now, I’m always down for criticizing characters, especially if they are poorly written (which, sadly, female characters often are.) But if you are bashing a character because they are a lady or in way of your pairing, that’s just dumb and plain hateful. But it happens.

Anyway, I suppose this helps further our earlier discussion because it shows just how deeply misogyny can permeate into geek culture, even in female-dominant fandoms. A lot of the time, those crazy fangirls don’t even realize that they are being misogynistic until someone points it out to them. It’s something that springs up unnoticed and unchecked… and that is very dangerous.

Bleh… spring break has rotted my brain, so late post is also a short post.


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